cheatsheet:

newsweek-paris-france:

We love traditional Paris cafés, and we work in a lot of different ones. But the Starbucks at l’Opéra is really in a class by itself. What do you think? Got a favorite Paris café office?

Everything is better in Paris—even your American coffee chain.

cheatsheet:

newsweek-paris-france:

We love traditional Paris cafés, and we work in a lot of different ones. But the Starbucks at l’Opéra is really in a class by itself. What do you think? Got a favorite Paris café office?

Everything is better in Paris—even your American coffee chain.


newsweek:

Forty-two years ago today, the successful execution of mission Apollo 11 allowed humans access to the Earth’s moon for the very first time. American astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin explored the lunar wonderland, erecting the flag of the United States on its rocky surface. That week, Newsweek ran with the above cover—a grainy shot of mankind’s first steps on the moon. Here’s how our editors at the time summed up the moment: 

“The feat of Apollo 11 was, in fact, the culmination of centuries of painstakingly acquired knowledge; the realization of dreams and myths as old as man’s consciousness itself; a magnificent opportunity to look deeply into the origins of the moon, the earth, and perhaps the universe; an exciting portent of the future. But most of all, it was a demonstration of what man’s ingenuity and courage and will can achieve when mobilized to a grand design.”

[Newsweek; July 28, 1969]

newsweek:

Forty-two years ago today, the successful execution of mission Apollo 11 allowed humans access to the Earth’s moon for the very first time. American astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin explored the lunar wonderland, erecting the flag of the United States on its rocky surface. That week, Newsweek ran with the above cover—a grainy shot of mankind’s first steps on the moon. Here’s how our editors at the time summed up the moment: 

“The feat of Apollo 11 was, in fact, the culmination of centuries of painstakingly acquired knowledge; the realization of dreams and myths as old as man’s consciousness itself; a magnificent opportunity to look deeply into the origins of the moon, the earth, and perhaps the universe; an exciting portent of the future. But most of all, it was a demonstration of what man’s ingenuity and courage and will can achieve when mobilized to a grand design.”

[Newsweek; July 28, 1969]

(via cheatsheet)




What does English sound like to foreign ears?

We’ve all heard examples of fake Chinese or German from speakers who lack familiarity with either language. While typically cringe-worthy, these examples do raise interesting questions regarding our own language. What does English sound like to non-English speakers? After more than 40 years, Adriano Celentano’s “Prisencolinensinainciusol” remains one of the most illuminating examples.

The entire song is nonsense verse, neither English nor Italian, but the sounds are meant to resemble English. Linguist Mark Liberman wrote an interesting post about this sort of thing over at Language Log discussing yaourter, the French word for an attempt to speak or sing in a foreign language that one doesn’t know all that well. This often involves trying to sing a foreign song with nonsense or random words filling in the blanks. Liberman shares this wonderful quote from a random Internet user:

Just for the story, in France, when we don’t speak English and we want to imitate the sound, we call it “yaourter”(to yoghourt), the imitation sounds like a very nasal language, kind of like a baby crying. It mostly imitates the “cowboy” accent.

(via teachplaysing)


Women in Music


INSPIRATION

INSPIRATION